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Modified Brunelli procedure : Scapho-lunate ligament reconstruction for wrist instability using Biotenodesis screw(Arthrex)

Overview

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Learn the Modified Brunelli procedure : Scapho-lunate ligament reconstruction for wrist instability using Biotenodesis screw(Arthrex) surgical technique with step by step instructions on OrthOracle. Our e-learning platform contains high resolution images and a certified CME of the Modified Brunelli procedure : Scapho-lunate ligament reconstruction for wrist instability using Biotenodesis screw(Arthrex) surgical procedure.

This is a detailed step by step instruction through a Modified Brunelli reconstruction of the scapho-lunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) also know as the 3 ligament tenodesis. 

The operation is performed to restore carpal mechanics following a SLIL injury and often subsequent attrition of the secondary stabilisers leading to a dorsal-intercalated segment instability (DISI). SLIL injuries over 4-6 weeks old are often very difficult to repair primarily and may require reconstruction if symptoms persist. If the wrist remains symptomatic despite appropriate rehabilitation, splintage and analgesia therapy, surgery may be required.

This can be the case in Geissler grade 3 or 4 ligament tears seen arthroscopically and may also be the operation of choice in grade 1 scapho-lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) in conjunction with a radial styloidectomy.

The operation uses a third to a half of the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendon which is passed through the scaphoid, across the dorsal lunate and around the dorso-radiocarpal ligament (DRC). This aims to reconstruct the volar secondary stabiliser of the scapho-trapezial-trapizoid ligament (STT), the dorsal limb of the SLIL and tighten the secondary stabiliser of the DRC. The operation is performed as a daycase procedure and the patient is placed in cast for 4-6 weeks following the procedure to start focussed rehabilitation once casting is complete. 

Patients often return to light work at 8 weeks, heavy work at 3 months and continue to strength and improve up to a year post-operation.

Author: Mr Mark Brewster FRCS (Tr & Orth)

Institution: The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham ,UK.

Author:Mr Mark Brewster FRCS (Tr & Orth)

Institution: The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, UK.

Surgical Steps

Welcome to the surgical steps quiz.

This tests your ability to recall the correct order in which the key steps of an operation should be performed.

There will be various legitimate variations in this order but the quiz doesn’t reflect this.
Your reference point for the steps quiz is just our operative technique.
It’s one starting point in helping you to learn the technique.

  • You simply “drag & drop” the boxes containing the descriptions of the steps into the order you think fits and submit for marking.
  • If you get it correct first time you will be presented your certificate at the end of the quiz.
  • If you need to do more work on the steps you access your marked version by clicking the“re-sit the quiz” button.
  • This will show the steps you ordered correctly highlighted in green and the incorrect ones in red.
  • The correct green steps are fixed and won’t move.
  • The red steps move differently after your initial attempt and swap locations with the step they are dragged and dropped onto .
  • Finally resubmit the quiz once again.
  • The quiz will let you keep going until you get all the steps in the right order.
  • The correct green steps are fixed and won’t move.
  • The red steps move differently after your initial attempt and swap locations with the step they are dragged and dropped onto .
  • Finally resubmit the quiz once again.
  • The quiz will let you keep going until you get all the steps in the right order.

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