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Proximal median nerve release at the pronator tunnel surgical technique

Overview

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Learn the Proximal median nerve release at the pronator tunnel surgical technique with step by step instructions on OrthOracle. Our e-learning platform contains high resolution images and a certified CME of the Proximal median nerve release at the pronator tunnel surgical procedure.

The commonest site of compression of the median nerve is the carpal tunnel. Rarely, a primary more proximal compression may be responsible for symptoms and a careful review of patients with failed symptom resolution after carpal tunnel decompression (CTD) may identify a source of proximal compression that requires release.

There are various common sites pression at this site may be due to the lacertus fibrosis, the proximal edge of the pronator muscle or the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) arch. The typical symptoms include proximal forearm pain, sensory disturbance in the radial volar digits and palm, Tinel’s sign at the point of compression and pain on resisted pronation or resisted FDS contraction to the middle finger.

Imaging of the nerve should be performed prior to surgery to exclude an intrinsic nerve tumour or extra-neural mass causing pressure in this tight space. Surgery aims to identify the median nerve at the proximal edge of the lacertus fibrosus and trace distally decompressing the nerve throughout its course while protecting proximal motor branches.

Dominic Power MA MB BChir(Cantab)FRCSEd FRCSLon FRCS(Tr & Orth)

Consultant Hand and Peripheral Nerve Surgeon

Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer, University of Birmingham, UK

West Midlands Peripheral Nerve Injury Service

Birmingham Hand Centre, UK

 

 

Author: Dominic Power FRCS (Tr & Orth)

Institution: West Midlands Peripheral Nerve Injury Service, Birmingham Hand Centre, UK

Surgical Steps

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  • The correct green steps are fixed and won’t move.
  • The red steps move differently after your initial attempt and swap locations with the step they are dragged and dropped onto .
  • Finally resubmit the quiz once again.
  • The quiz will let you keep going until you get all the steps in the right order.

COURSE PROGRESS

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